Interview mit Thomas Bosch zur Bedeutung des Mikrobioms in Zeiten von Covid-19

Yuuki Obata and Vassilis Pachnis from The Francis Crick Institute in London wrote a wonderful commentary in PNAS on our recent paper concluding that our studies in Hydra will be extremely valuable to understand the function and contributions of pacemaker cells (of mesenchymal or neural origin) to intestinal physiology and host defense against pathogens. Read the commentary here.

Video 1

Spontaneous body contractions of Hydra (65x acceleration). The spontaneous contractions are shrinkages of the body column that occur periodically in the absence of any exogenous stimuli.

Reference: Murillo-Rincon, A.P., Klimovich, A., Pemöller, E. et al. Spontaneous body contractions are modulated by the microbiome of Hydra. Sci Rep 7, 15937 (2017) doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16191-x

Video 3

In vivo imaging of neuronal activity in the hypostome of Hydra. The method of generating transgenic Hydra strains that express genetically encoded Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent proteins (GCaMP) in specific neuronal populations is established in the Bosch lab in Kiel. Here, the activity of the neuronal population N6 is induced by addition of reduced glutathione (GSH).

Credits: Christoph Giez / CAU Kiel

Video 5

Quantitative analysis of Hydra spontaneous contractile behavior. The animation explains the automatized video-recording of a freely behaving polyp and further analysis of the image sequence using a custom script to generate such metrics of the behavior as stretching and contractile capacity, contraction frequency and regularity.

Reference: Murillo-Rincon, A.P., Klimovich, A., Pemöller, E. et al. Spontaneous body contractions are modulated by the microbiome of Hydra. Sci Rep 7, 15937 (2017) doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16191-x

In times of social distancing: Thomas Bosch explains in an interview with the weekly newspaper „Der Freitag” why humans need the physical contact with each other and why microbes are so important (in German).

In Zeiten von Kontaktbegrenzung: Thomas Bosch erläutert in einem Interview „Unser Körper braucht Gemeinschaft”, warum menschliche Organismen auf den Austausch mit anderen angewiesen sind und welche Rolle dabei die symbiontischen Mikroben spielen. https://www.freitag.de/autoren/elsa-koester/unser-koerper-braucht-gemeinschaft