Longevity gene that makes the Hydra immortal identified

HydranewsThe Hydra is a tiny animal that can be found in just about any freshwater pond, just a few millimeters long, that has attracted the attention of scientists for years now due to its extraordinary regenerative abilities. The Hydra is consider to be biological immortal – it does not die from old age – although a scientific consensus has yet to be reached. Scientists studying the polyp Hydra claim they now know how the creature escapes senescence after they found a key gene. This gene is also believed to be linked with aging in humans.

The animal’s potential immortality is made possible by its reproductive system. The Hydra is an asexual being and doesn’t mate, instead it reproduces by producing buds in the body wall, which grow to be miniature adults and simply break away when they are mature. Popular scientific consensus has found that animals that reproduce later on and less frequently tend to live longer. The Hydra, however, begins to reproduce almost immediately.

➨The forever young Hydra

Biology Professor Daniel Martínez at first was extremely skeptical of the claim that Hydras were biological immortal. He set out to disprove this assumptions and cultured tens of specimens, which he kept in isolation waiting for them to die. It’s already been four years and no specimen has yet succumbed from natural causes. For an animal of this size, nature dictates that it should have died long before.

Returning to the Hydra’s reproductive system. For this vegetative-only reproduction to work, each polyp contains stem cells capable of continuous proliferation. “Hydra is a bag of stem cells,” Martinez says. “It is an adult that is produced by embryonic cells, so it is really a perennial embryo. The genes that regulate development are constantly on, so they are constantly rejuvenating the body.”

➨The gene that makes it all happen

As humans age, as well as many other complex biological lifeforms, stem cells lose the ability to proliferate and thus to form new cells. This causes tissue decline, which is why muscles get weakened with old age for instance. Influencing the processes that go with aging has been a goal for scientists science the advent of modern science. The Hydra might potentially have the ability to open new doors, especially after the latest research from scientists at the University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH) who recently found the gene that causes Hydra to be immortal – the FoxO gene.

Now, the gene itself isn’t something new. It’s been known by scientists for years and is present in all animals, and humans as well. However, until now it was not known why human stem cells become fewer and inactive with increasing age, which biochemical mechanisms are involved and if FoxO played a role in aging.

The German researchers genetically modified a batch of polyps such that they obtained Hydras with: no FoxO gene, deactivated FoxO gene and enhanced FoxO gene. Their findings show that the animals with no FoxO gene have significantly fewer stem cells. Interestingly, the immune system in animals with inactive FoxO also changes drastically.

“Drastic changes of the immune system similar to those observed in Hydra are also known from elderly humans,” explains Philip Rosenstiel of the Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology at UKSH, whose research group contributed to the study.

The researchers go on to note that there’s a link between FoxO and aging in humans.

“Our research group demonstrated for the first time that there is a direct link between the FoxO gene and aging,” says Thomas Bosch from the Zoological Institute of Kiel University, who led the Hydra study. Bosch continues: “FoxO has been found to be particularly active in centenarians — people older than one hundred years — which is why we believe that FoxO plays a key role in aging — not only in Hydra but also in humans.”

➨Fighting aging in humans

That’s to say that FoxO has been proven to be linked with aging in humans, since testing such a hypothesis would require genetic modification of actual people. Remember, that the Hydra is an extremely primitive organism – immortal as it may be. Imagine that if you take a hundred hydra, make a cell suspension, dissociate all the tissue, put it in a centrifuge, make it into a bowl, you’ll soon see how from those cells, somehow they bind together and you’ll get a couple of new hydras!

It’s been tested with mice, however, and apparently though they didn’t make them immortal, the enhanced gene therapy did in fact prolonged their lives considerably.

Here’s the take away: FoxO gene plays a decisive role in the maintenance of stem cells, according to these findings. I may be overstating this, so someone please correct me if so, but it also means that the FoxO gene determines life span in all animals, from simple being to the top of the food chain humans. So what’s the key to longevity? The maintenance of stem cells and the maintenance of a functioning immune system. If you you’ve got these two in cue, you’ve got nothing to worry about – except freak accidents!

I recommend you also read one of my earlier pieces which also discusses another immortal animal – that’s right, you’re own backyard flatworm. This little puppy can regenerate its cells indefinitely thanks to the telomerase enzyme, which keeps DNA telomeres from shrinking and thus also keeps cell regeneration indefinite.

The findings of the German scientists were documented in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences(PNAS).

(c)zmescience

Immunobiological functioning of toll-receptors revealed

JavierThe polyp Hydra, together with corals and jellyfish, belongs to the phylum Cnidaria. The polyps in which the toll-receptor was now studied grow up to one centimeter. Microscopic photography. Credit: Kiel University The puzzle about the ancestral function of toll-receptors has been solved. For more than 25 years, researchers from medicine and biology have been studying toll-receptors, revealing functions in immune defence on the one hand and developmental biology on the other. A research team from Kiel University (Germany) is now reporting that toll-receptors have primarily served to identify germs and to control bacterial colonisation of organisms – typical immune defence functions. The study was now published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and has implications for human medical research. “Studying cnidarians, we were able to show that toll-receptors have been involved in immune defence already in this evolutionarily old phylum and that cnidarians can therefore serve as model organisms for human immunology research”, says Thomas Bosch from the Zoological Institute of Kiel University who led the project. Toll receptors exist in many animal species as well as humans. Cnidarians are convenient research objects, because they live in plain aquaria, have a simple genome, and can be examined easily in experiments. Furthermore, they live in association with few types of bacteria compared to humans. As many fundamental research questions in medicine cannot be studied directly in humans, for ethical and practical reasons, fundamental toll-receptor research can now be carried out with cnidarians instead. With two Nobel Prizes dedicated to toll-receptor research in recent history, the topic has proven to be of major importance for science and society. In 1985, the so-called toll-receptors were first discovered as a key factor in of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). For these findings, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Edward Lewis und Eric Wieschaus were awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for medicine. Toll-receptors again received much attention in science when researchers discovered a new function: in both the fruit fly as well vertebrate animals – evolutionarily much younger than insects – the toll-receptor helped to identify germs. Biologists Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler and Ralph Steinmann received the Novel Prize for medicine for these astonishing results in 2011.
With two Nobel Prizes dedicated to toll-receptor research in recent history, the topic has proven to be of major importance for science and society. In 1985, the so-called toll-receptors were first discovered as a key factor in embryonic development of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). For these findings, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Edward Lewis und Eric Wieschaus were awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for medicine. Toll-receptors again received much attention in science when researchers discovered a new function: in both the fruit fly as well vertebrate animals – evolutionarily much younger than insects – the toll-receptor helped to identify germs. Biologists Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler and Ralph Steinmann received the Novel Prize for medicine for these astonishing results in 2011. Scientifically, the subsequent question was: Which function – regulation of embryonic development or immune defence – was first in evolution? In order to solve this puzzle, scientists of Kiel University in cooperation with Max-Planck-Institute of Evolutionary Biology Plön studied the function of toll receptors in an evolutionarily very old group, cnidarians, that have been existing for more than 600 million years. The scientists compared morbidity and bacterial colonisation of regular and genetically modified polyps of the genus Hydra. The study resulted in strong evidence for immunobiological functioning of the toll-receptors, implying that developmental functions of the toll-receptor are characteristic of insects, which are evolutionarily much younger.

Evolutionary Biology: Researchers Solve Toll-Receptor Puzzle

toll1Oct. 31, 2012, The puzzle about the ancestral function of toll-receptors has been solved. For more than 25 years, researchers from medicine and biology have been studying toll-receptors, revealing functions in immune defence on the one hand and developmental biology on the other. A research team from Kiel University (Germany) is now reporting that toll-receptors have primarily served to identify germs and to control bacterial colonisation of organisms — typical immune defence functions. The study was now published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and has implications for human medical research. „Studying cnidarians, we were able to show that toll-receptors have been involved in immune defence already in this evolutionarily old phylum and that cnidarians can therefore serve as model organisms for human immunology research,” says Thomas Bosch from the Zoological Institute of Kiel University who led the project. Toll receptors exist in many animal species as well as humans. Cnidarians are convenient research objects, because they live in plain aquaria, have a simple genome, and can be examined easily in experiments. Furthermore, they live in association with few types of bacteria compared to humans. As many fundamental research questions in medicine cannot be studied directly in humans, for ethical and practical reasons, fundamental toll-receptor research can now be carried out with cnidarians instead. With two Nobel Prizes dedicated to toll-receptor research in recent history, the topic has proven to be of major importance for science and society. In 1985, the so-called toll-receptors were first discovered as a key factor in embryonic development of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). For these findings, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Edward Lewis und Eric Wieschaus were awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for medicine. Toll-receptors again received much attention in science when researchers discovered a new function: in both the fruit fly as well vertebrate animals — evolutionarily much younger than insects — the toll-receptor helped to identify germs. Biologists Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler and Ralph Steinmann received the Novel Prize for medicine for these astonishing results in 2011. Scientifically, the subsequent question was: Which function — regulation of embryonic development or immune defence — was first in evolution? In order to solve this puzzle, scientists of Kiel University in cooperation with Max-Planck-Institute of Evolutionary Biology Plön studied the function of toll receptors in an evolutionarily very old group, cnidarians, that have been existing for more than 600 million years. The scientists compared morbidity and bacterial colonisation of regular and genetically modified polyps of the genus Hydra. The study resulted in strong evidence for immunobiological functioning of the toll-receptors, implying that developmental functions of the toll-receptor are characteristic of insects, which are evolutionarily much younger.

KN Leser Uni- Vortrag zum Thema Sex war gut besucht

Dieses Thema zog. Zum zweiten Themenabend der aktuellen Vortragsreihe „KNow-how“ war der Hans-Heinrich-Driftmann-Hörsaal der Kieler Universität am Mittwochabend fast bis auf den letzten Platz belegt. Gleich zu Beginn seines Vortrages hatte der Forscher zwei ernüchternde Botschaften für die Damen und Herren im Publikum. Am Abend vor dem Vatertag versicherte er den Männern, dass sie aus evolutionsbiologischer Sicht nahezu unnötig seien. Den Frauen gab er mit auf den Weg: „Drum prüfe, wer sich ewig bindet.“ Der Zoologe und Evolutionsexperte erforscht die Fortpflanzung von Organismen und stoße wie Generationen von Wissenschaftlern zuvor immer wieder auf die Erkenntnis: „Sex ist umständlich, aufwändig und riskant.“ Dies belegten die Vögel bei der Balz, Hirsche mit absurd großen Geweihen oder das alltägliche menschliche Verhalten. Äußerlichkeiten wie diese hätten oft nur ein Ziel: „Es geht darum, Spermien in eine Eizelle zu bringen.“
Lebewesen wie Blattläuse und die Hydra beweisen jedoch seit Jahrmillionen erfolgreich, dass es auch ohne die geschlechtliche Fortpflanzung geht. „Wozu also Sex?“ Mittlerweile gehen die Forscher davon aus, dass sich die Lebewesen „in einem ständigen Wettrüsten zwischen Wirt und Parasit“ befinden und sich über den Austausch der Gene bei der geschlechtlichen Fortpflanzung einen kleinen, aber dauerhaften Vorsprung verschaffen. Die Wissenschaft umschreibt dies mit dem „Sieg der roten Königin“ – angelehnt an die Geschichte von „Alice hinter den Spiegeln“, die an der Seite der roten Königin über ein Schachbrett hetzt und doch nicht von der Stelle kommt. „Hierzulande musst du so schnell rennen wie du kannst, wenn du am gleichen Fleck bleiben willst“, erklärt die Königin in der Geschichte. Auf die Evolution übertragen bedeute dies: „Wir müssen uns ständig und unermüdlich ändern. Wenn wir aufhören, sind wir verloren“, so Bosch.
„Wir fanden den Vortrag sehr interessant“, sagte Manfred Bacher aus Schwentinental im Anschluss. Generell sei die Veranstaltungsreihe der Kieler Nachrichten in Zusammenarbeit mit der Christian-Albrechts-Universität eine gute Möglichkeit für Laien, Einblicke in komplexe wissenschaftliche Themen zu bekommen. Für fast alle Vorträge habe er sich zusammen mit seiner Frau Gudrun bereits Karten gesichert. Vieles, was Prof. Thomas Bosch erklärt hatte, kannte Timo Salewski bereits aus dem Biologie-Unterricht. „Interessant fand ich den Aspekt, bei dem es um den Wettlauf zwischen Parasit und Wirt ging“, sagte der Kieler. Er war mit einigen Freunden in den Hörsaal gekommen. Auch wenn es ihr in Teilen „zu theoretisch“ gewesen sei, war der Abend dennoch „sehr informativ“, sagte Zuhörerin Regina Möller. „Das Thema gehört einfach zum Leben dazu.“

Von Paul Wagner, KN

Preisgekrönte Studienleistungen und Promotionen

Vollbild anzeigenANNA MAREI BÖHM, Zoologisches Institut, ist für ihre Arbeiten zur Langlebigkeit beim Süßwasserpolypen Hydra mit dem Doktorandenpreis 2013 der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Entwicklungsbiologie (GfE) ausgezeichnet worden. Der winzige Süßwasserpolyp Hydra zeigt keine Alterungsprozesse und ist potentiell unsterblich. Innerhalb eines Forschungsteams der Zoologie unter Leitung von Professor Dr. Thomas Bosch fand Böhm heraus, dass hierfür das sogenannte FoxO-Gen, das auch im Menschen vorkommt, verantwortlich ist. Die Studien bestätigen, dass das FoxO-Gen eine entscheidende Rolle beim Erhalt von Stammzellen und somit der Bestimmung der individuellen Lebensspanne spielt – vom ursprünglichen Nesseltier bis hin zum Menschen. Zum anderen verdeutlichen sie, dass der Alterungsprozess und die Langlebigkeit eines Organismus tatsächlich von zwei wesentlichen Faktoren abhängig sind: dem Erhalt von Stammzellen und der Aufrechterhaltung eines funktionellen Immunsystems. Die GfE ist ein Zusammenschluss von Forschenden in der Entwicklungsbiologie im deutschen Sprachraum. Sie veranstaltet in zweijährigem Turnus dreitägige wissenschaftliche Tagungen und unterstützt außerdem Aktivitäten ihrer Mitglieder wie zum Beispiel Workshops oder Symposien. Ebenfalls im zweijährigen Rhythmus findet die GfE School statt, die die Förderung von Nachwuchswissenschaftlerinnen und -wissenschaftlern zum Ziel hat. Aus Mitteln privater Stiftungen vergibt die GfE Preise für herausragende Leistungen auf dem Gebiet der Entwicklungsbiologie. Der Doktorandenpreis ist mit 500 Euro dotiert.

Dem Geheimnis des Alterns auf der Spur

Warum altern wir? Wann sterben wir und wieso? Gibt es ein Leben ohne Altern? Schon seit Jahrhunderten faszinieren diese Fragen die Wissenschaft. Jetzt haben Forscherinnen und Forscher aus Kiel untersucht, warum das Nesseltier Hydra unsterblich ist – und stießen unerwartet auf einen Zusammenhang mit dem menschlichen Altern. Die Studie der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU) in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH) erscheint in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). bionitypress

Der Schlüssel zum ewigen Leben

Biologin Anna Marei Böhm gehört zum Team von Thomas Bosch und erforscht in ihrer Doktorarbeit die Regulation von Stammzellen in der Hydra. Hier untersucht die 30-Jährige am Fluoreszenzmikroskopgenetisch veränderte Zellen, die leuchtend grün markiert wurden. Foto: schulze (2)
Kieler Wissenschaftlern gelingt Durchbruch bei Altersforschung / Prof. Thomas Bosch: “Wir sind am Entschlüsseln universeller Grundregeln”

Kiel. Seit Jahrtausenden ist die Menschheit auf der Suche nach Unsterblichkeit und ewiger Jugend. In der Tierwelt gibt es potenziell unsterbliche Spezies – Seegurkenarten, Pilze oder Süßwasserpolypen gehören dazu. Eine direkte Verbindung zum Menschen gab es bislang jedoch noch nicht. Gestern haben Kieler Wissenschaftler der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU) ihre neuesten Forschungsergebnisse vorgestellt. Demnach ist dem Team um den Zell- und Entwicklungsbiologen Thomas Bosch vom Zoologischen Institut der CAU der Durchbruch in der Altersforschung gelungen. Die Kieler Forscher haben deutliche Hinweise darauf gefunden, dass das sogenannte FoxO-Langlebigkeitsgen das Altern der Menschen steuert. Die Erkenntnis kam per Zufall. Im Zentrum der Forschung stand ursprünglich der bis zu drei Zentimeter große Süßwasserpolyp Hydra, der durch eine permanente Stammzellenteilung im Grunde unsterblich ist.

Verantwortlich für das ewige Leben der Hydra ist das FoxO-Gen, das vor allem bei den Menschen nachweisbar ist, die älter als 100 Jahre werden. Wie bei der Hydra in der griechischen Mythologie ist der Süßwasserpolyp in der Lage, abgeschlagene Körperteile innerhalb von drei Tagen neu zu bilden. “Die Hydra hat eine unglaubliche Regenerationsfähigkeit”, sagt Bosch. Diese bahnbrechende Entdeckung machten die CAU-Forscher in Kooperation mit dem Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH). “Das war ein Heureka-Event für uns.”

Um den Einfluss des FoxO-Gens beim Stammzellenwachstum herauszufinden, manipulierten die Forscher die Gene der Hydra. Tiere, die die Langlebigkeitsgene nicht mehr hatten, alterten deutlich schneller. Mit diesen Erkenntnissen sollen jetzt Rückschlüsse auf die Altersforschung beim Menschen gezogen werden. Denn für Bosch ist klar: Stammzellen spielen beim Altern eine wichtige Rolle und haben auch auf das Immunsystem einen entscheidenden Einfluss. Bosch: “Hierbei sind wir am Entschlüsseln universeller Grundregeln.” Der Kieler Wissenschaftler betont aber gleichzeitig, nicht auf der Suche nach der ewigen Jugend beim Menschen zu sein: “Wir wollen das menschliche Altern nicht aufhalten, auch weil es vermessen ist, anzunehmen, es aufhalten zu können.”

Ziel sei es vielmehr, Leiden im Alter zu lindern und neue therapeutische Maßnahmen zu entwickeln. “Altern und Sterben sind beim Menschen vorprogrammiert, und das ist auch gut so”, betont Bosch.

Das Problem: Mit dem Alter verlieren die menschlichen Stammzellen immer mehr die Fähigkeit, neue Zellen zu bilden. Die Folge: Die Regeneration des alternden Gewebes wird immer schlechter, auch die Muskelkraft lässt nach. Gerade Umweltfaktoren seien bei diesem Prozess von großer Bedeutung. Deren Einfluss schätzt Bosch auf 80 Prozent ein. Daher soll auch erforscht werden, welche Umweltfaktoren ein Fortbestehen des FoxO-Gens begünstigen. “Dieser Weg ist noch völlig unbeschritten”, erklärt der Zellbiologe.

Und wie geht es jetzt weiter? “Wir werden einen Drittmittelantrag stellen, um ein umfassendes Verständnis über das FoxO-Gen zu erlangen.” Die neuen Erkenntnisse der Kieler Forscher könnten auch dabei helfen, langfristig Fortschritte bei der Linderung neuronaler Krankheiten wie Parkinson oder Alzheimer zu erzielen.

Forscher entdecken “Gen des Alterns”

Wissenschaftliche Sensation an der Kieler Universität: Forscher entdeckten jetzt ein Gen, das für das Altern der Menschen verantwortlich ist. Die spektakuläre Entdeckung war dabei reiner Zufall.

Kiel. Warum altern wir? Wann sterben wir und warum? Gibt es ein Leben ohne Altern? Schon seit Jahrhunderten faszinieren diese Fragen die Wissenschaft. Jetzt haben Forscher der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU) deutliche Hinweise darauf gefunden, dass das Altern des Menschen vom sogenannten Langlebigkeitsgen gesteuert wird.

Das sogenannte FoxO-Gen ist zwar seit längerem bekannt und kommt in allen Tieren bis hin zum Menschen vor. Die Kieler Forscher hätten jedoch nachweisen können, dass das Gen eine entscheidende Rolle beim Erhalt von Stammzellen und der Bestimmung der individuellen Lebensspanne spielt, wie die CAU am Dienstag mitteilte.

Beim Menschen verlieren mit dem Alter die Stammzellen ihre Fähigkeit, neue Zellen zu bilden. Alterndes Gewebe kann sich dadurch kaum noch regenerieren. Dadurch werden letztendlich auch Muskeln abgebaut. Gelänge es, diesen Prozess zu beeinflussen, würden sich auch alte Menschen länger wohl und körperlich fit fühlen, sind sich die Kieler Wissenschaftler sicher. Sie wollen jetzt erforschen, wie das „Langlebigkeitsgen“ im Detail funktioniert und welchen Einfluss die Umwelt auf FoxO hat.

Die Forscher untersuchten eigentlich, warum das Nesseltier Hydra unsterblich ist – und stießen unerwartet auf einen Zusammenhang mit dem menschlichen Altern. Die Studie, die am Zoologischen Institut der CAU in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH) entstand, erscheint in der kommenden Woche im Fachjournal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

mit dpa