Nerves control the body’s bacterial community

The Bosch lab proves, that there is close cooperation between the nervous system and the microbial population of the body

Nerve cells

Nerve cells (in green) of the freshwater polyp Hydra produce antimicrobial peptides and thus shape the animal’s microbiome. Rod-shaped bacteria can be seen at the base of the tentacles, marked in red. Image: Christoph Giez, Dr. Alexander Klimovich

A central aspect of life sciences is to explore the symbiotic cohabitation of animals, plants and humans with their specific bacterial communities. Scientists refer to the full set of microorganisms living on and inside a host organism as the microbiome. Over the past years, evidence has accumulated that the composition and balance of this microbiome contributes to the organism’s health. For instance, alterations in the composition of the bacterial community are implicated in the origin of various so-called environmental diseases. However, it is still largely unknown just how the cooperation between organism and bacteria works at the molecular level and how the microbiome and body exactly act as a functional unit. An important breakthrough in deciphering these highly complex relationships has now been achieved by the Bosch lab. Using the freshwater polyp Hydra as a model organism, the Kiel-based researchers and their international colleagues investigated how the simple nervous system of these animals interacts with the microbiome. They were able to demonstrate, for the first time, that small molecules secreted by nerve cells help to regulate the composition and colonisation of specific types of beneficial bacteria along the Hydra’s body column. The scientists published their new findings in Nature Communications this Tuesday September 26 2017

Fibres

Fibres of intestinal tissue (in red) surround the nerve cells (in green) of the freshwater polyp Hydra. Image: Christoph Giez, Dr. Alexander Klimovich

Original publication:
René Augustin, Katja Schröder, Andrea P. Murillo Rincón, Sebastian Fraune, Friederike Anton-Erxleben, Ava-Maria Herbst, Jörg Wittlieb, Martin Schwentner, Joachim Grötzinger, Trudy M. Wassenaar, Thomas C.G. Bosch (2017): “A secreted antibacterial neuropeptide shapes the microbiome of Hydra”. Nature Communications, Published on September 26, 2017, doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00625-1